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We have developed a broad and varied careers curriculum for students across all year groups. The aim is to create an atmosphere of awareness on career options from Year 7 forward, with an increasing focus on paths and further outcomes as our students enter their final Year at the Academy. A details table of what is offered for each year group and when can be found below.

Developing Through Career, Employability & Enterprise Education

Area of learning from  the CDI’s 17 areas of learning KS3 Learning outcome statement Suggested KS3 activities Y7 Y8 Key Stage 4 Learning outcome Statement Suggested KS4 activities Y9 Y10 Y11
1 Self-awareness:

Individuals who realistically appraise their qualities and skills, roles and responsibilities, values and attitudes, needs and interests, aptitudes and achievements are better able to understand themselves, make informed choices and relate well to others. Self-awareness provides individuals with the foundation for enhancing their self-esteem, developing their identity and achieving personal wellbeing.

Describe yourself, your strengths and preferences Students complete a range of self-assessment activities  and record the results in their careers journals Recognise how you are changing, what you have to offer and what’s important to you Students complete an occupational interest’s task and discuss the results with their tutor/mentor. *Students describe what they like about how they have changed since Year 7.
2 Self-determination:

Self-determination enables individuals to develop personal autonomy, self-efficacy and personal agency. It boosts hope, optimism, adaptability and resilience. Self- determination empowers individuals to realise their aspirations and manage their careers.

Tell positive stories about your wellbeing, progress and achievement. *Students tell the story of their earliest memories of what they were good at and interested in. They look at their story for clues about what they are like today.

*Students use pictures and symbols on a personal shield to identify who they are and tell others about themselves

Explain how you use positive versions of your own story to manage your wellbeing, progress and achievement. Students set personal and learning targets to build on their strengths
3 Self-improvement as a learner:

Self-improvement fosters positive attitudes to lifelong learning and the skills of planning, review and reflection. Understanding what they have learned, what they need to learn next and how they learn best enables individuals to develop their potential.

Explain how you have benefited as a learner from careers, employability and enterprise activities and experiences *In their small group, students review their experience of taking responsibility for interviewing a visitor. *Students keep a skills log (skills passport). Review and reflect upon how you have benefited as a learner from careers, employability and enterprise activities and experiences Students who have had placements in similar working environments compare and contrast what they have learnt from their work experience.

Learning about careers and the world of work  (Careers Exploration)

Area of learning from  the CDI’s 17 areas of learning KS3 Learning outcome

statement

Suggested KS3 activities  Y7  Y8 Key Stage 4 Learning outcome Statement Suggested KS4 activities  Y9  Y10  Y11
Exploring careers and career development:

Career exploration expands individuals’ horizons and opportunities. A better understanding of career processes and structures enables individuals to make sense of and manage their own careers. It also enables them to appreciate the career experiences of others.

Describe different ways of looking at people’s careers and how they develop Students find out how the careers of different members of staff have developed and then reflect on the similarities and differences between them. *Students create career timelines to summarise the career of someone they admire. Explain key ideas about career and career development Students weigh up the pros and cons of several types of careers, e.g. single-track careers, serial careers, portfolio careers and lifestyle careers. *This could be through a series of careers talks presented in a ‘speed-dating’ exercise. Careers Focus Day 3 Careers Focus Day 3
Understanding business and industry: Understanding types of business and business functions enables individuals to prepare for employment and to appreciate the contribution of business and industry to social and economic life Describe the organisation and structure of different types of business Students investigate the types of businesses involved in the exploitation of commodities from the raw material stage to the finished product. *Students list the jobs involved in getting an everyday items to consumers.

*Students make a spider diagram of the contractors and suppliers linked to their own school.

Explain different types of businesses, how they operate and how they measure success Students look at the pros and cons of different kinds of business entities, e.g. sole trader, partnerships, company and franchise in the private sector.

*Students compare and contrast their experience of taking part in two different enterprise simulations – one based on a share-holder model and the other based on a co-operative model.

Careers Focus Day 3
Investigating jobs and labour market information (LMI):

Individuals need to know how to access, analyse and act on relevant and appropriate job and labour market information when choosing and planning for careers.

Be aware of what job and labour market information (LMI) is and how it can be useful to you. *Students investigate opportunities for women in the STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) industries.

*Students analyse local job vacancies using job vacancy websites, apps, newspapers and other sources.

*Students use comprehensive websites to research local LMI.

Find relevant job and labour market information (LMI) and know how to use it in your careers planning Students analyse national and local data on the destinations of last year’s leavers and consider possible implications for their own plans. *Students use comprehensive websites to research local LMI and use this information when considering part-time work. They should research at least 3 different types of jobs and be prepared to discuss their findings
Valuing equality, diversity and inclusion:

Individuals need to recognise that the commitment to equality, diversity and inclusion in British society benefits them as much as others. By resisting the damage caused by stereotyping, discrimination and prejudice, individuals can realise their own ambitions and help others to do so

Identify how to stand up to stereotyping and discrimination that is damaging to you and those around you. Students gain advice on how to combat stereotyping and discrimination Recognise and challenge stereotyping, discrimination and other barriers to equality, diversity and inclusion; and know your rights and responsibilities in relation to these issues. Students interview employers about good practice in carrying out their duties under the Equality Act 2010 ‘to make reasonable adjustments to their workplaces to overcome barriers experienced by disabled people’.

*Students investigate progress in tackling ‘the glass ceiling’ in the leading professions, e.g. engineering, architecture, law, medicine, accountancy, etc.

*Career talks are part of an employer-led curriculum learning experience

Learning about safe working practices and environments:

Learning about safe working practices and environments helps individuals to keep themselves and others healthy and safe at work.

Be aware of the laws and by-laws relating to young people’s permitted hours and types of employment; and know how to minimise health and safety risks to you and those around you Students write a true or false quiz to test other students’ knowledge of the laws and bylaws relating to the employment of school-age children.

*A local employer talks about the importance of the laws and as an employer what are their responsibilities to their employees.

Be aware of your responsibilities and rights as a student, trainee or employee for following safe working practices. Students carry out a risk assessment.

*Students research health and safety requirements and guidelines for tools and equipment that they use, e.g. machine tools in D&T subjects and for work experience placement opportunities .

*An HR consultant provides a talk on rights and responsibilities at work 

Take your child to work day

Developing career management, employability and enterprise skills (Careers Management)

Area of learning from  the CDI’s 17 areas of learning KS3 Learning outcome statement Suggested KS3 activities Y7 Y8 Key Stage 4 Learning outcome Statement Suggested KS4 activities Y9 Y10 Y11
10 Making the most of careers information, advice and guidance (CEIAG):

Individuals need to learn how to recognise trusted sources of information, advice and guidance and how to make effective use of all the sources of help and support available to them, including one-to- one  guidance.

Identify and make the most of your personal network of support including how to access the impartial careers information, advice and guidance and distinguish between objectivity and bias. Students create a mid-map or visual representation of their networks of careers influences and supporters.

*Students produce a guide to ‘making the most of information, advice and guidance’ in their school.

*Employers are invited to deliver career learning activities to get the most out of developing networking skills

Build and make of your personal network of support including making effective use of impartial careers information, advice and guidance and distinguish between objectivity and bias. *Students discuss their options with family, friends, school staff and career specialists and carefully weigh up the advice received.

*Students examine through case studies what impartiality means when it is applied to careers guidance practice. *Students are introduced to employers.

11 Preparing for employability:

A priority for individuals is to gain the skills and experience that will enable them to get jobs and sustain themselves in employment.

Recognise the qualities and skills needed for employability and provide evidence for those you have demonstrated both in and out school Students maintain a skills log recording their best demonstrations of the qualities and skills needed for employability.

*Employers provide an introduction to what are employability skills as part of the careers-led curriculum. *Students are taken as a group to a workplace to see the skills in action.

Show that you have acquired and developed qualities and skills to improve your employability Students use their career journals to record their key skill development.

*Students practise filling out application forms that ask them to provide evidence of the skills and qualities that they have demonstrated.

*Employers provide CV workshops demonstrating the latest thinking in CV presentation, what they expect to see and what they will not accept.

*Employers are involved in the work experience programme

12 Showing initiative and enterprise:

Showing initiative and enterprise helps individuals to learn about risk, effort and making to most of opportunities.

Recognise when you are using the qualities and skills that entrepreneurs need Students plan and deliver a series of environmental awareness projects as part of academy’s “green school “ campaign

*Students gain experience of enterprise projects.

Careers Focus Day 3 Show that you can be enterprising in the way you learn, carry out work and plan your career *Local employers run sessions through ‘Work Discovery Week’ and ‘Work Discovery Sector Days’.

Students set a marketing challenge such as how to promote a healthy lifestyle

*Local employers provide longer term business competitions to develop enterprising and entrepreneurial skills.

13 Developing personal financial capability:

The increasing cost of training and further and higher education makes it essential for individuals to know about managing their money. They need to know how to make decisions about spending, saving and investing to ensure their economic well-being now and in the future.

Show that you can manage a personal budget and contribute to household and school budgets *Students take part in a simulation that challenges them to manage a household budget.

*Students use a personal budget planner to work out a budget.

Careers Focus Day 2 Careers Focus Day 2 Show that you can manage your own money, understand personal financial documents and know how to access financial support for further study and training Students calculate the cost of higher education against an apprenticeship and how the return on their investment can be managed.

*Students complete modules explaining tax and national insurance matters.

*Students attend careers fairs to research the implications of choosing one pathway over another.

14 Identifying choices and opportunities:

Individuals need to be able to research and recognise suitable progression pathways and qualifications, Using networking, negotiation, information and evaluation skills enables individuals to maximise their choices and opportunities, including those that

Look systematically at the choices and opportunities open to you when you reach a decision point *Students produce subject posters giving the facts about the qualifications, skills and jobs that can gain by studying particular subjects.

*Employers are invited in to co-deliver curriculum learning and provide an insight into their own experiences.

Research your education, training, apprenticeship, employment and volunteering options including information about the best progression pathways through to specific goals *Students draw up a list of questions to ask stallholders that they want to meet at a forthcoming careers fair.

*Students get involved with ‘Work Discovery Week’ and ‘Work Discovery Sector Day’ activities.

15 Planning and deciding:

Individuals need to know how to get information, clarify values and references, identify alternatives, weigh up influences and advice, solve problems, review decisions and make plans. It also involves being able to cope with chance events and unintended consequences.

Know how to negotiate and make plans and decisions carefully to help you get the qualifications, skills and experiences you need Groups form small company teams to solve a problem. They have to negotiate their roles in the team and the main features of the campaign (enterprise projects).

*Students engage in target-setting and review activities with their tutors and subject teachers

Know how to make important plans and decisions carefully including how to solve problems and deal appropriately with influences on you Students learn how to weigh up different factors affecting their decisions.

*Students take part in role plays to practise using the three main styles of communication and conflict resolution (i.e. being passive, assertive or aggressive).

 16 Handling applications and interviews:

Promoting themselves in a way that attracts the attention of selectors and recruiters as well as managing the applications process requires individuals to develop a range of self-presentation and marketing skills that they will need throughout their lives.

Know how to prepare and present yourself well when going through a selection process Students apply for leadership roles in the school, e.g. as School Council representatives, peer mentors, etc.

*Students apply for trips, projects, challenges, etc.

*Employers co-deliver a curriculum learning activity on presentation skills.

Know your rights and responsibilities in a selection process and the strategies to use to improve your chances of being chosen Students take part in a mock interview for a suitable position (e.g. and apprenticeship, a college place or a job) and prepare a CV beforehand. *Students complete a ‘true’ or ‘false’ quiz about questions relating to equality of opportunity that interviews are not allowed to ask candidates.
17  Managing changes and transitions:

Plans and decisions can break down if individuals fail to prepare for the careers moves that they need to make. Awareness of how to cope with life changes and transitions, partly gained from reflecting on previous moves, can support lifelong career development and employability.

Show that you can be positive, flexible and well-prepared at transition points in your life Students prepare for their options process by attending the Year 9 careers fair, options assemblies, options evening, etc.

*Year 9 students have back-up plans in case they cannot have all their first-choice options.

*Students write a guide/blog for Year 6 students on how to make a success of the move from primary to secondary school.

Annuals Careers Fayre Review and reflect on previous transitions to help you improve your preparation for future moves in education, training and employment Students recall the range of experiences that they and others had when making decisions at 13+ and suggest how the lessons learnt can be applied to their decisions at 16+.

*Students say what they think should be in an induction programme for young people going to college, work-based learning or an apprenticeship.

Careers education programme overview- student entitlements

By beginning careers education at the very start of their time at Sandhill View, students’ aspirations and motivation are increased; they are more equipped  to make better informed decisions at key transition stages.

Year 7
  • Students identify personal traits, strengths and skills and develop confidence and have high expectations of themselves.
  • Students begin to think about what they might like to achieve after school.
  • Students are introduced to the world of work and how it is constantly changing.
  • Students investigate different types of businesses.
  • Students are introduced to labour market information.
  • Students participate in the Y7 practice interview programme
  • Students have opportunities to engage with a local business, FE, HE and training providers
  • Students are introduced to careers resources and websites.
  • Students have optional access to independent and impartial advisers via a referral system.
Year 8
  • Students build on personal strengths and begin to link personal qualities and skills to specific careers enabling realistic and informed decisions at key transition stages.
  • Students complete the Buzz Quiz in preparation for thinking about possible careers they may be suited to.
  • Students investigate different types of businesses and industries and job families.
  • Students investigate their teachers’ career pathways and reflect upon the differences.
  • Students reflect on how changes to the world of work may affect their own future career pathways
  • Students begin to think about GCSE options in terms of career pathways and plan their future.
  • Students link curriculum areas to careers to help prepare them for choosing their GCSE options
  • Students have optional access to independent and impartial advisers via a referral system.
  • Students use careers resources and websites and learn where to find out more about specific courses/careers.
  • Students have   a range of opportunities to engage with a local business, FE, HE and training providers
Year 9
  • Students are encouraged to re-assess personal strengths with a focus on employability skills.
  • Students are encouraged to reflect on their decision-making skills and how this may impact upon their career planning.
  • Students investigate different jobs and careers and what they mean in terms of lifestyle, budgeting and a good work/life balance and develop financial capability Students reflect on how work is changing and how it impacts upon people’s lives
  • Students are encouraged to recognise and challenge stereotypes within the world of work (including the glass ceiling) and traditional job roles.
  • Students have optional access to independent and impartial advisers via drop in sessions. They are also encouraged to use careers resources and websites and learn where to find out more about specific courses/careers and how to access LMI independently.
  • Students have a wide range of opportunities to engage with a range of local business, FE, HE and training providers.
  • Students attend careers talks and fairs,
  • Students take part in ‘Take your child to work day’ and reflect upon how they have benefited.
Year 10
  • Students explore post- 16 pathways in in more detail
  • Students have a wide range of opportunities to engage with a range of local business, FE, HE and training providers.
  • Students attend careers talks and fairs and are encouraged to access LMI independently.
  • Students reassess personal strengths with a focus on transferable skills in preparation for CV completion and mock interviews
  • Financial capability is developed further and students are encouraged to think about employability, which careers appeal to them and to identify and set themselves realistic future goals.
  • Students have optional access to independent and impartial advisers via a referral system. They are also encouraged to use careers resources available and informed where to find out more about specific courses/careers.
  • Students arrange and complete work experience and reflect upon how they have benefited.
  • Students develop interview techniques and complete a mock interview with a local employer.
Year 11
  • Students are supported with post- 16 choices and encouraged to consider all their options including further study and apprenticeships.
  • Students are encouraged to consider how LMI is relevant to their post- 16 options.
  • All students have a one to one guidance interview with a Connexions personal advisor (L6 qualified and matrix accredited). They are also encouraged to use careers resources available and informed where to find out more about specific courses/careers.
  • Students use careers interviews to help understand different career pathways and entry requirements and are encouraged to make contingency plans should results be better/worse than expected and set personal targets for development.
  • Students are encouraged to think about the kind of behaviour potential employers look for
  • Students are encouraged to attend careers talks, fairs, college open days and taster days with employers.
  • Students are assisted further with CV writing and encouraged to have completed a CV and cover letter before the application process begins.
  • Students are kept up to date with post 16- deadlines, open evenings and appropriate internal and external careers events.